...walk a mile

From The Cooper Institute and Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

Change starts when someone sees the next step. - William Drayton


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Exercise  Makes For Bigger Brains
Written by October 11, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Are you a parent that is concerned that your child is not getting enough physical activity or even someone who is concerned about the level of physical activity of our youth? I know that there are some days that I have to take my son, who is a toddler, with me to run errands and I feel guilty because he goes from sitting in the car seat, to sitting in the cart for an extended period of time, back to sitting in the car seat. On days where this is not the case he literally runs all day, nonstop, whether

Coaching For Weight Loss: It's Not What You Say, But How You Say It
Written by October 8, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Many doctors today are actually taking time out of their brief patient interactions to talk about weight loss. Given that most Americans are overweight or obese, this is a good thing. But, unfortunately, physician recommendations on behavior change aren’t very effective unless delivered using certain techniques. A recent study by researchers at Duke University Medical Center set out to determine whether the use of motivational interviewing (MI) techniques by physicians during weight-related conversations were related to weight loss 3 months after the encounter1. Researchers audiorecorded 40 primary care physicians during 461 of their visits with overweight or obese patients. They

Is there really such a thing as "Go Go Gadget Shoes?"
Written by October 4, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Is there really such a thing as "Go Go Gadget Shoes?" The cartoon character "Inspector Gadget" had many different special gadgets. The gadgets were stored all over his body. They were available to help him get out of trouble. Some of his most commonly used gadgets included binoculars, inflating trench coat, telescoping legs or arms, skates and even springs. The closest to "Go Go Gadget Shoes" were the springs. They could be put on his head to allow him to bounce off his head when falling or put on his legs to jump. While there may not actually be such

Where Did the Plain Water Go?
Written by October 1, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Is it not cool for kids today to drink plain water? While my toddler is fascinated by the drinking fountain (or bubbler as we called it up North), most teens won’t get near one at school or in public. And while plastic water bottles may not be a faux paux, more kids carry bottles filled with sugary drinks. This leaves many parents and health professionals wondering, “Does my kid drink enough water?” To answer this question, researchers recently looked at the water intake of almost 4,000 boys and girls aged 2 to 19 years, who had been included in a national nutrition

A Bracelet That Improves Performance?: How to Evaluate a Product’s Effectiveness
Written by September 13, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

You may have been out at your town or city’s exercise hotspot and noticed people wearing a colored bracelet that looks somewhat like a watch. This bracelet is different from the silicone bracelets that serve as an awareness and information tool for various charity campaigns that were popularized by Nike and Lance Armstrong through the yellow Livestrong bracelet. cPRIME™ is a patent-pending product that claims that it may yield benefits in strength, balance, flexibility, and endurance. How exactly can a bracelet do this? Our body exchanges information through a series of electrical events. A coordination of this exchange is important

Do Americans Think They're Thinner Than They Really Are?
Written by September 10, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

According to a recent poll, Americans do think they are thinner than they really are. Almost 2,500 American adults were asked through an online survey to report their height, weight, and perceived category of weight – underweight, normal weight, overweight, or obese. The Harris Interactive/HealthDay pollsters calculated each person’s body mass index (BMI), a ratio of weight to height and determined their actual weight category. Results showed: 30% of the those in the “overweight” BMI category believed they were “normal weight” 70% of those in the “obese” BMI category believed they were just “overweight” Most survey responders who felt they

Does altering an exercise make it better?
Written by September 6, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

New ways to challenge the body in the weight room are frequently explored by lifters. As individuals explore new ways to lift and challenge the upper body, different hand placements are often tested. In the push-up exercise, research by Cogley et al.1 found that an increased number of muscles were activated in a push-up with a narrow hand placement compared to wide hand placement. In the lat pulldown exercise, a wide grip hand position was shown by Signorile et al.2 to be the best hand placement for latissimus dorsi activation during both phases of the lift. But what about changing

Exercise for Weight Maintenance: How Long??
Written by August 16, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

  What is the most important factor in weight maintenance? Level of physical activity, caloric intake, or other factors? About 80% of people who lose weight gain it back. How can we keep the weight off? An article in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research reviewed the research addressing the amount of exercise necessary to prevent weight gain2.  Low physical activity was found to account for about 77% of weight gain in one year. Exercise and physical activity play a primary role in weight maintenance. The other 23% may be affected by diet and metabolism. A study in International

No Image
Written by August 9, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

  Toning shoes, wellness shoes, fitness shoes, rocker shoes—whatever you want to call them, their use, especially among women, is on the rise. As a matter of fact, some experts predict that this segment of the footwear industry will grow into a $1 billion market in the next few years1. And while they are all the rage now, toning shoes, as we will call them for the rest of this discussion, have been around for quite some time. Even podiatrists use this style of shoe to help treat a variety of problems. Toning shoes are characterized by a curved sole,

Weight Training In the Water?
Written by August 2, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Summer is upon us and everyone is looking for ways to stay cool. The pool is a haven for most during the summer months to stay cool. Water splashing here and there, but have you thought about using the water for a place to get a workout. Water resistance has long been used for rehabilitation, but what about using it for a regular resistance training workout. While I was in Korea recently, they had water resistance workout equipment as depicted in the picture above. Can a workout in the pool provide just as good of a workout as using resistance

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