...walk a mile

From The Cooper Institute and Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

You may delay, but time will not. - Benjamin Franklin


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The Tire Flip
Written by June 7, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

One of the popular trends in fitness, functional training was recently discussed. Another popular trend in fitness is the usage of boot camps and other type of fitness classes. Many of these classes use untraditional exercises and functional exercises. One exercise that is sometimes used is the tire flip. This is an exercise that is sometimes seen in strongman events. The exercise normally uses large tires. Many times the tires are from a tractor or other big truck. Individuals crouch down into a low squatted position in front of the tire. Then grab the bottom of one side of the

Energy Usage of Functional Training
Written by May 28, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

A new type of training referred to as functional training has increased in popularity. Functional training is “multiplaner, multijoint resistance exercises that simulate movement patterns from everyday life and sport.”1 To find exercises for functional training, look at activities in your daily life. Think of squatting down and getting something out of a low cabinet. This can be turned into a functional training exercise in the weight room. To convert the exercise you may add weight by doing a standing low row. You might stand holding onto handles of an adjustable cable pulley with arms extended in front of you.

Are You Short on Time? Make Weight Training Count!
Written by May 24, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

What if you could burn calories faster while strength training? A recent study1 compared the calories burned during two types of strength training workouts – traditional and superset. Traditional involves completion of one set of repetitions for a specific exercise followed by an inactive rest period. Superset training works two opposing muscle groups before taking a recovery period. Working opposing muscle groups allows the first muscle to rest while the opposing muscle group is working.   The study measured calories burned during the two types of resistance training. Ten active men (average age 22 years and 165 pounds) completed a superset

The Way to Get Teens to Be More Physically Active May Be Through Their Phones
Written by May 10, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Sounds crazy right? A device that many of us associate with sedentary behaviors can help increase physical activity? The reality is mobile devices are extremely popular amongst the teenage population. According to a national survey from CTIA (The Wireless Association®) and Harris Interactive, four out of five teens (17 million) carry a wireless device1. The study titled “Teenagers: A Generation Unplugged” also found that a majority of teens (57%) view their cell phone as the key to their social life and that most admitted to spending nearly an equal amount of time talking as they do texting each month.  So

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Written by May 3, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Tom Brokaw was the keynote speaker last week as The Cooper Institute celebrated its 40th anniversary. The celebration paid tribute to Dr. Kenneth Cooper, whose name is synonymous worldwide with wellness and physical fitness programs. “Long before wellness became part of the health care debate, Ken Cooper was promoting fitness and personal responsibility, a message that has an enduring urgency for all ages,” said Brokaw, now a special correspondent for NBC News. The former NBC Nightly News anchor spoke about his personal passion for healthy living at the luncheon. Today Mr. Brokaw remains very active and has found an interest in

Does Exercise Make You Hungry?
Written by April 26, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Does Exercise Make Us Hungry? There has been much debate about the effect of exercise on appetite and energy intake.  Although some scientists have proposed that exercise stimulates appetite; most studies do not support this finding.  A recent study published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise4 examined the effect of walking on appetite and food intake.  In the study, subjects participated in two different trials – an exercise and a nonexercise (control) trial.  One day subjects walked for 60 minutes on a treadmill with some mild shortness of breath but were still able to hold a conversation.  On

Pedometer Use: Adding to What We Know Already Works
Written by April 19, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Gilbert R. Kaats, Ph.D. is passionate about health enhancing products and has researched them over the past 32 years.  This blog is a summary of his research and findings regarding the usefulness of pedometers.1  The concept is simple as related by Kessinger in the December 2007 issue of The Original Internist “…Find what works, make sure it works, and then add to it; re-tool one good idea with another. Never take away from what works. Always add to it.” 2 Pedometers work; they serve to increase physical activity and “…the device is a great little motivator.” Says Dr. Dena Bravata.

Keep A Sharp Mind By Minding Your Blood Pressure
Written by April 14, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Ninety percent of Americans will have high blood pressure by the time they kick the bucket.  One-half of Americans over the age of 60 currently have high blood pressure.  The fact that high blood pressure increases risk for stroke and heart disease makes it something everyone should pay attention to.  The urgency is compounded by the more recent findings that high blood pressure is associated with increased risk for dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.  Changes in diet, increased physical activity, weight loss, and of course, medications have been shown to reduce blood pressure.  But the prevalence of high blood pressure and

Shoes or No Shoes?
Written by April 12, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

With the arrival of spring you may have seen some people out running without any shoes on or wearing something that looks like a glove on their feet. Well the latest buzz around the fitness industry is—yes, you guessed it—barefoot running. While barefoot running is in the spotlight now, it actually has been around for quite some time. The running shoe wasn’t invented until the 1970’s so this is a relatively new piece of equipment when you look at how long humans have been running. And even since the running shoe emerged, the trend of barefoot running has come around

Smith Machine versus Free Weight Bench: A battle of goals
Written by March 29, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Weight rooms continue to add new machines and tools to allow exercisers to work out in a variety of ways. Most weight rooms have many different machines and exercises that can work the upper body. The bench press, works the pectoralis major, triceps barchii and anterior deltoid, with stabilization by the medial deltoid.  A variety of equipment and a large number of options such as a free weight bench press, seated chest press, or Smith Machine bench press can be used to perform a bench press exercise. But how do these machines and exercises fare in regards to last week’s

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