...cut out the soda

From The Cooper Institute and Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

When you've got something to prove, there's nothing greater than a challenge. - Terry Bradshaw


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knee
Written by August 13, 2015

Michael Harper, MEd

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

When someone mentions (or perhaps, you experience) bad knees, the term osteoarthritis often comes to mind. Osteoarthritis is a degenerative condition of the cartilage of synovial joints and commonly affects the knee joint.  Osteoarthritis is  pervasive in society today, and affects sedentary individuals as well as those who maintain a physically active lifestyle. While athletic activity does not have a cause and effect relationship with osteoarthritis, traumatic injury that sometimes results from athletic pursuits can increase the likelihood of its occurrence – which I think may explain the issues that have plagued me and my knees. Currently I’ve been able

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Written by August 6, 2015

Steve Farrell, PhD, FACSM

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

Cancer is the second leading cause of death among U.S. men and women, accounting for nearly 600,000 deaths each year as well as ~$250 billion in annual health care costs. The top 5 leading causes of cancer death for U.S. men and women1 are shown below in Table 1. Table 1. Leading causes of cancer death in U.S. men and women. Men Annual Number of Deaths Women Annual Number of Deaths Lung ~87,000 Lung ~73,000 Prostate ~28,000 Breast ~40,000 Colorectal ~27,000 Colorectal ~25,000 Pancreatic ~20,000 Pancreatic ~20,000 Liver ~15,000 Ovarian ~14,000 A common statement that I frequently hear is that

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Written by July 30, 2015

Sue Beckham, PhD

Director of Adult Initiatives
The Cooper Institute

What’s the best strategy for helping others adopt healthier behaviors? These tips will help you to assist that friend, coworker, or family member struggling with change, determine their readiness to change, and nudge them forward in the process. 1. You can facilitate change but you cannot change someone else. An individual must make their own decision to change. You can show your support, but no amount of nagging or coercion will force someone to change if they are not ready. So don’t take on the responsibility for their decisions and actions. Do what you can and realize that the rest is up to

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Written by July 23, 2015

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Summer is upon us. And here in Texas, that means you stay indoors – a lot. This can be a problem because when you hide inside you’re closer to the fridge and the Laz-E-Boy. Calorie balance can get really out of whack during the summer with vacations, patriotic holidays, and longer daylight hours. Here are ways you can get up and/or get out during the hot months. Remember, when it’s hot outside, your body needs more water. Make sure you stay well-hydrated whether you choose to move indoors or outdoors. Indoor at Home Pop in a favorite physical activity video or DVD and start moving. Get a couple so

backneck
Written by July 7, 2015

Karyn Hughes, MEd

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

There are numerous lifestyle factors related to back and neck pain such as poor posture, improper biomechanics, poor flexibility, muscle weakness, upper body obesity, and smoking.

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Written by July 2, 2015

Steve Farrell, PhD, FACSM

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

If you watch television, you might have seen and heard a “non-attorney spokesperson” plead with persons who have been prescribed statin drugs to call the number provided due to the “dramatic increase in cases of type 2 diabetes caused by statin drugs.” Statin drugs are commonly used to decrease blood levels of LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides, and have been shown to significantly decrease the risk of cardiovascular morbidity (illness) and mortality (death). In an earlier blog, Do Statin Drugs Increase the Risk of Diabetes?, we found that the benefits of reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease by taking a statin were

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Written by June 25, 2015

Steve Farrell, PhD, FACSM

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

It’s pretty much accepted far and wide that regular aerobic exercise is good for you. From the earliest studies by Drs. Jeremy Morris and Ralph Paffenbarger in the 1950s up to the present time, there have been thousands of publications documenting the beneficial effects of regular aerobic exercise on health and well-being. A partial list of these benefits (from our Personal Training education course) can be found in Table 1. Current public health guidelines for aerobic activity recommend a minimum of 150 minutes per week at a moderate intensity, or a minimum of 75 minutes per week at a vigorous

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Written by June 18, 2015

Steve Farrell, PhD, FACSM

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

For well over a century, a cornerstone for middle distance and endurance competitors has been long slow distance (LSD) training. In addition to performing LSD, these individuals also perform interval training (IT) on a regular basis. IT is best described as alternating high intensity work periods (intervals) with low intensity work periods (recovery) within the same workout. The pace that the intervals are done at is usually slightly faster than or at goal race pace. There are an infinite number of variations for interval training workouts. The distance covered as well as the time for each interval, the number of intervals

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Written by May 21, 2015

Steve Farrell, PhD, FACSM

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

Most of us who are very active know how important it is to consume fluids, carbohydrate, and electrolytes (salts) during endurance exercise. Doing so helps to prevent dehydration and hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), which in turn helps to delay fatigue. The scientific literature is chock full of studies regarding the beneficial effect of sports drinks during long-term exercise. However, less is known about post-exercise nutrition. For endurance athletes who are training on a daily basis, what and when they consume foods and beverages post-exercise has become a hot topic in the exercise science research world over the past few years.

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Written by May 14, 2015

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Does Exercise Make Us Hungry? There has been much debate about the effect of exercise on appetite and energy intake throughout the years. Although some scientists have proposed that exercise stimulates appetite; most studies do not support this finding. A study published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise4 examined the effect of walking on appetite and food intake. In the study, subjects participated in two different trials – an exercise and a non-exercise (control) trial. On one day subjects walked for 60 minutes on a treadmill at an intensity where they had some mild shortness of breath, but were still able to

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