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From The Cooper Institute and Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

I take nothing for granted. I now have only good days, or great days. - Lance Armstrong


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Written by July 2, 2015

Steve Farrell, PhD, FACSM

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

If you watch television, you might have seen and heard a “non-attorney spokesperson” plead with persons who have been prescribed statin drugs to call the number provided due to the “dramatic increase in cases of type 2 diabetes caused by statin drugs.” Statin drugs are commonly used to decrease blood levels of LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides, and have been shown to significantly decrease the risk of cardiovascular morbidity (illness) and mortality (death). In an earlier blog, Do Statin Drugs Increase the Risk of Diabetes?, we found that the benefits of reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease by taking a statin were

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Written by June 25, 2015

Steve Farrell, PhD, FACSM

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

It’s pretty much accepted far and wide that regular aerobic exercise is good for you. From the earliest studies by Drs. Jeremy Morris and Ralph Paffenbarger in the 1950s up to the present time, there have been thousands of publications documenting the beneficial effects of regular aerobic exercise on health and well-being. A partial list of these benefits (from our Personal Training education course) can be found in Table 1. Current public health guidelines for aerobic activity recommend a minimum of 150 minutes per week at a moderate intensity, or a minimum of 75 minutes per week at a vigorous

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Written by June 18, 2015

Steve Farrell, PhD, FACSM

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

For well over a century, a cornerstone for middle distance and endurance competitors has been long slow distance (LSD) training. In addition to performing LSD, these individuals also perform interval training (IT) on a regular basis. IT is best described as alternating high intensity work periods (intervals) with low intensity work periods (recovery) within the same workout. The pace that the intervals are done at is usually slightly faster than or at goal race pace. There are an infinite number of variations for interval training workouts. The distance covered as well as the time for each interval, the number of intervals

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Written by May 21, 2015

Steve Farrell, PhD, FACSM

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

Most of us who are very active know how important it is to consume fluids, carbohydrate, and electrolytes (salts) during endurance exercise. Doing so helps to prevent dehydration and hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), which in turn helps to delay fatigue. The scientific literature is chock full of studies regarding the beneficial effect of sports drinks during long-term exercise. However, less is known about post-exercise nutrition. For endurance athletes who are training on a daily basis, what and when they consume foods and beverages post-exercise has become a hot topic in the exercise science research world over the past few years.

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Written by May 14, 2015

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Does Exercise Make Us Hungry? There has been much debate about the effect of exercise on appetite and energy intake throughout the years. Although some scientists have proposed that exercise stimulates appetite; most studies do not support this finding. A study published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise4 examined the effect of walking on appetite and food intake. In the study, subjects participated in two different trials – an exercise and a non-exercise (control) trial. On one day subjects walked for 60 minutes on a treadmill at an intensity where they had some mild shortness of breath, but were still able to

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Written by April 30, 2015

Rachel Huber, MPH, RD

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

As the summer nears, you may notice more people getting in shape for swimsuit season. Shedding a few pounds and toning muscles in order to look their best at the pool, lake, or beach. Let’s bounce back to an earlier post that reminds us how logging your food and physical activity can help modify your behaviors in support of healthier choices. Study after study has found that people who keep a daily record of foods and beverages consumed as well as minutes of physical activity have greater success balancing calories and achieving and maintaining a healthy weight. In fact, a large

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Written by March 19, 2015

Lauren Ruzicka B.S., MPH Candidate


Are you sitting down? If so, I hope that in a few minutes, you’ll be motivated to hop to your feet! You are probably aware of the harms of a sedentary lifestyle – the increased risk for obesity, chronic illness, and a shortened life span – but knowing the tragic facts and figures unfortunately doesn’t solve the problem that so many of us face.1,2 Over 80% of working Americans are in sedentary jobs, and on average these workers are at work 47 hours per week.3 If we’re supposed to be moving more, we’re probably not going to find time…we’re going

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Written by March 12, 2015

Rachel Huber, MPH, RD

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

March is National Nutrition Month. This campaign raises awareness of the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits, which brings to mind an earlier post that encourages healthy behaviors. Year after year national guidelines urge Americans to do physical activity and eat a healthy plant-based diet. And year after year Americans become more sedentary and choose more highly-processed foods high in fat and calories. So what’s the disconnect? Are our healthy messages too complex? Do Americans not see the benefits of a healthy lifestyle? Or, perhaps, are Americans trying to change, but just not using

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Written by March 5, 2015

Steve Farrell, PhD, FACSM

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is defined as the body’s maximal ability to transport and utilize oxygen at the tissue level. Results from the Cooper Center Longitudinal Study (CCLS)1 and other large studies, have consistently shown that individuals with low CRF have higher all-cause, cardiovascular disease, and cancer mortality (death) rates than those with moderate CRF, and that the risk continues to decrease when we look at those with high CRF (Figure 1). In the CCLS, low CRF is defined as a treadmill stress test performance in the bottom 20% compared to others of the same age group and gender. This is

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Written by February 12, 2015

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Happy Valentine’s Day weekend! As you consider the heart-shaped candies, red roses, and sweet treats for your loved ones, think about doing something for your heart health, too! Each year since 1963, the President of the United States has proclaimed February as American Heart Month. As the proclamation states, “It is the number one killer of American women and men, and it is a leading cause of serious illness and disability. Across our Nation, we have lost devoted mothers and fathers, loved siblings, and cherished friends to this devastating epidemic.”1 More than 2,200 Americans die of cardiovascular disease each day.

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