...learn about calories

From The Cooper Institute and Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

It's choice - not chance - that determines your destiny. - Jean Nidetch


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slip hazard
Written by September 25, 2014

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

High-risk situations such as increased work hours, periods of stress, or even bad weather have the potential to cause even the most committed exerciser or healthy eater to slip back into unhealthy habits. It’s important to think about the situations, events, people, thoughts, and feelings that may keep you from achieving or maintaining your goals. Once you identify high risk situations, you can build a plan to deal with them in positive and helpful ways. As the saying goes, “When the going gets tough, the tough get going!” Below are some challenging situations that people often face when making changes

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Written by September 11, 2014

Steve Farrell, PhD

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

In a previous post we discussed the relationship between cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) level and future risk of dying from heart failure (HF)1. Specifically, higher levels of CRF significantly decreased the risk of HF death in a group of nearly 45,000 men who were followed for an average of 20 years. In two other posts, one in 2013 and one earlier this year, we wrote about some of the cardiovascular and mental health benefits of increased dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3’s are commonly known as fish oils, but are also found in plant-based foods such as walnuts. The most

football
Written by September 4, 2014

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Today is the NFL season opener between the reigning Super Bowl Champion Seattle Seahawks and the Green Bay Packers. Football season brings fun and excitement but it also brings hours of sitting and lots of food and drinks, which can pose a challenge to our weight loss or weight maintenance efforts. Let’s revisit some tips we have posted in the past that hopefully will help you to engage in healthy behaviors while allowing you to enjoy the greatness that football season is! Schedule a time to be active. No, jumping up in excitement and then sitting back down doesn’t count—well maybe

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Written by August 21, 2014

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Can eating too much sugar cause diabetes? It is widely accepted that eating too much of any food (sugar included) causes you to gain weight which in turn can lead to obesity which, yes, is a predisposition to diabetes. I’m reminded of a recent study that provides evidence that there may be a direct and independent link between sugar and diabetes. Researchers looked at food availability in 175 countries and after controlling for a large number of factors—other food types including fiber, meats, fruits, oils, cereals; total calories; overweight and obesity; aging; urbanization; income; physical activity; tobacco use; alcohol use—an

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Written by August 7, 2014

Ruth Ann Carpenter, MS, RD

Lead Integrator
Health Integration, LLC

Can you believe it’s already August? Time to trade the flip flops and swimwear for back packs and lunch boxes! Great summer memories have been made and now it’s time to go back to school. I’m reminded of an earlier post about calorie density that can help parents prepare healthy (and yummy) lunches for their favorite students! Energy balance is all about managing the calories we take in (food and beverages) and the calories we burn off with daily energy needs and physical activity. Increasing physical activity to 60 minutes or more each day is key to increasing the ‘calories

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Written by July 10, 2014

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

For years, many women have limited or avoided eating fish during pregnancy or feeding it to their young children. Their concern—mercury—which in high enough levels has the potential to damage their developing nervous systems. And in fact, in 2004, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued recommendations stating maximum amounts of fish that pregnant women and young children should be limited to, but at the time, did not promote a minimum amount that should be consumed. Research over the past 10 years, has overwhelmingly highlighted the importance of “appropriate” amounts of fish in the

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Written by July 3, 2014

Rachel Huber, MPH, RD

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Happy Independence Day, America! Freedom, family, picnics, parades, barbecues, and fireworks pop into mind. And let’s not forget the over-indulgent hot dog eating contests! An earlier post pops to mind that encourages you to “think before you eat!” How frequently do you eat? Do you eat because you are physically hungry or do you eat as a result of other internal or external factors - like because you’re bored or because you’re at a party? Researchers from the University of North Carolina set out to answer these questions by analyzing data from several national surveys of food intake in the U.S. They

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Written by June 26, 2014

Carey Shore, MSc


The average U.S. adult consumes 14.6% of total daily calories from added sugars, such as those found in non-diet soft drinks and many other foods and beverages. High intake of added sugars is associated with higher calorie intake and lower diet quality, which can increase the risk for obesity, prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease1. Because of Americans preference for sweeter foods, the use of non-nutritive sweeteners (NNS) has exploded over the past few decades. Since 1958, the Food and Drug Administration has been responsible for evaluating the safety and acceptable daily intake levels of NNS for the population.

Banana Split
Written by June 19, 2014

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Summer is coming… This Saturday, June 21!! With the summer heat comes cool thoughts of beaches, water parks, and ice cream. Yummy ice cream – a delicious, somewhat nutritious (i.e., calcium), hot weather treat. But be mindful that ice cream is high in calories. For example, a Baskin-Robbins banana split would add 1,010 calories to your day’s total calorie intake. For many people, that could be more than 50% of their daily calorie need. OMG! It’s okay – stay calm. An earlier post floats to mind that can help you “keep your cool” when selecting summer chillers and planning activities. The TodayIWill website

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Written by June 12, 2014

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

For years, scratch that, decades we have known that as a nation we need to move more and eat less but unfortunately our attempts to do so have been failing. It seems that we keep trying the same methods that don’t work. Insanity, by the way, can be defined as is doing the same thing over and over again expecting different results. So what is the key to engaging in a healthier lifestyle and losing weight? Many individuals, especially those who are already living a healthy lifestyle, have the mentality of “just do it” but the reality is making behavior

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