...walk a mile

From The Cooper Institute and Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

Never, never, never, never give up. - Winston Churchill


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slip hazard
Written by September 25, 2014

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

High-risk situations such as increased work hours, periods of stress, or even bad weather have the potential to cause even the most committed exerciser or healthy eater to slip back into unhealthy habits. It’s important to think about the situations, events, people, thoughts, and feelings that may keep you from achieving or maintaining your goals. Once you identify high risk situations, you can build a plan to deal with them in positive and helpful ways. As the saying goes, “When the going gets tough, the tough get going!” Below are some challenging situations that people often face when making changes

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Written by September 18, 2014

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Fall is nearly upon us. The shorter days, changing foliage, and decrease in temperatures means a rapidly growing to-do list around the house. You know like cleaning the garage, storing items in the attic, and raking the leaves. These to-do’s are considered lifestyle physical activities, which are important to our health. In a previous post we discussed how a regular exercise program alone may not be enough of a protection if you spend a good portion of your day sitting. As a reminder, research has demonstrated a dose-response association between sitting time and mortality from all causes, independent of leisure

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Written by September 11, 2014

Steve Farrell, PhD

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

In a previous post we discussed the relationship between cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) level and future risk of dying from heart failure (HF)1. Specifically, higher levels of CRF significantly decreased the risk of HF death in a group of nearly 45,000 men who were followed for an average of 20 years. In two other posts, one in 2013 and one earlier this year, we wrote about some of the cardiovascular and mental health benefits of increased dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3’s are commonly known as fish oils, but are also found in plant-based foods such as walnuts. The most

football
Written by September 4, 2014

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Today is the NFL season opener between the reigning Super Bowl Champion Seattle Seahawks and the Green Bay Packers. Football season brings fun and excitement but it also brings hours of sitting and lots of food and drinks, which can pose a challenge to our weight loss or weight maintenance efforts. Let’s revisit some tips we have posted in the past that hopefully will help you to engage in healthy behaviors while allowing you to enjoy the greatness that football season is! Schedule a time to be active. No, jumping up in excitement and then sitting back down doesn’t count—well maybe

crunch with trainer
Written by August 28, 2014

Sue Beckham, PhD

Director of Adult Initiatives
The Cooper Institute

Lots of core exercises we do challenge the global core muscles like the abdominals and back muscles. These muscles tend to be larger, more superficial muscles like the rectus abdominis, obliques, erector spinae, and hip muscles. Other muscles, called local core muscles are typically smaller and deeper than the global muscles. These muscles don’t produce much movement but primarily contract statically to stabilize the spine during lower and upper body movements. The local core muscles include the transversus abdominis, piriformis, pelvic floor, and multifidi, as well as other muscles in the hip and core. The local core muscles which stabilize

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Written by August 21, 2014

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Can eating too much sugar cause diabetes? It is widely accepted that eating too much of any food (sugar included) causes you to gain weight which in turn can lead to obesity which, yes, is a predisposition to diabetes. I’m reminded of a recent study that provides evidence that there may be a direct and independent link between sugar and diabetes. Researchers looked at food availability in 175 countries and after controlling for a large number of factors—other food types including fiber, meats, fruits, oils, cereals; total calories; overweight and obesity; aging; urbanization; income; physical activity; tobacco use; alcohol use—an

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Written by August 14, 2014

Jennifer Broze, B.S. candidate


Does it really matter whether you do strength training before or after your cardiovascular training? It is important to consider the primary goal of your workout when deciding which to do first. One study looked at the effects on fat loss and cholesterol levels. Maryam and his colleagues2 studied 30 overweight females with a BMI over 25 kg/m2.  Subjects were divided into three groups – 1) strength training followed by endurance (SE) training, 2) endurance followed by strength (ES) training, and 3) control (C) group that did not do any training. Each group worked out three days per week for

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Written by August 7, 2014

Ruth Ann Carpenter, MS, RD

Lead Integrator
Health Integration, LLC

Can you believe it’s already August? Time to trade the flip flops and swimwear for back packs and lunch boxes! Great summer memories have been made and now it’s time to go back to school. I’m reminded of an earlier post about calorie density that can help parents prepare healthy (and yummy) lunches for their favorite students! Energy balance is all about managing the calories we take in (food and beverages) and the calories we burn off with daily energy needs and physical activity. Increasing physical activity to 60 minutes or more each day is key to increasing the ‘calories

bike race
Written by July 31, 2014

Sue Beckham, PhD

Director of Adult Initiatives
The Cooper Institute

Lactic acid gets blamed for everything from muscle soreness to muscle fatigue. Research does not suggest lactic acid plays a primary role in muscle fatigue but serves as an energy source for skeletal and cardiac muscle after its conversion to lactate. In fact, lactate can also be converted to glucose by the liver. Lactic acid production just might be your friend rather than your enemy. It is well­-known that the breakdown of glucose to make ATP (adenosine triphosphate) needed for energy during high intensity exercise produces lactic acid. Strong acids generate positively charged hydrogen ions. Lactic acid is a relatively

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Written by July 24, 2014

Steve Farrell, PhD

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

It is well-known that obesity and sedentary lifestyle are each strongly associated with all-cause mortality. Among Cooper Clinic patients, cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is measured via a maximal treadmill stress test, while adiposity status is measured via Body Mass Index (BMI), waist circumference, and percent body fat using the 7-site skinfold caliper method. It is not uncommon for an individual to be classified as obese using one measure of adiposity and non-obese using another measure. For example, one might be classified as non-obese when using BMI, but be classified as obese when using waist circumference. We designed a study to examine

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