...try a new exercise

From The Cooper Institute and Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

Smile, it increases your face value. - Dolly Parton


2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008
Assortment20of20Breads_jpg
Written by September 3, 2015

Steve Farrell, PhD, FACSM

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

It never ceases to amaze me how basic facts regarding nutrition can get blown out of proportion by the general population as well as the media. Take gluten, for example. If you listen to what most people are saying, you’d think that gluten is Public Enemy #1! Countless people are going to great lengths to avoid gluten in their diets, and food manufacturers are touting their ‘gluten-free’ products as being healthy. According to a survey by U.S. News and World Report, 41% of U.S. adults believe that ‘gluten-free foods are beneficial for everyone. However, before we all jump on the

road20block_jpg
Written by August 27, 2015

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

It’s that time of year again. Summer is winding down and the new school year is starting. I know for many parents this time is met with mixed emotions. On the one hand they think, how can another year have passed? How can my little (or not so little anymore) one be hitting yet another one of life’s milestones? How can the lazy days of summer be over? But at the same time they feel excited for the new experiences that they are in store for. They look forward to the more structured days and to be honest, getting the

Colorful20Vegetables20and20Fruits_jpg
Written by August 20, 2015

Steve Farrell, PhD, FACSM

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

The glycemic index (GI) for carbohydrate-containing foods and beverages was developed in the early 1980’s in order to try to improve blood glucose control in diabetic patients. The GI of a food or beverage is determined by the rise in blood glucose levels during the two-hour period following its ingestion versus the blood glucose response to an equivalent amount of carbohydrate in a standard food such as white bread.1  As a reference point, white bread has a GI of 100. Foods and beverages with a higher GI than 100 (e.g. instant rice) cause a higher rise in blood glucose than

knee
Written by August 13, 2015

Michael Harper, MEd

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

When someone mentions (or perhaps, you experience) bad knees, the term osteoarthritis often comes to mind. Osteoarthritis is a degenerative condition of the cartilage of synovial joints and commonly affects the knee joint.  Osteoarthritis is  pervasive in society today, and affects sedentary individuals as well as those who maintain a physically active lifestyle. While athletic activity does not have a cause and effect relationship with osteoarthritis, traumatic injury that sometimes results from athletic pursuits can increase the likelihood of its occurrence – which I think may explain the issues that have plagued me and my knees. Currently I’ve been able

healthy20beh_reminders_sticky20notes_XSmall_jpg
Written by August 6, 2015

Steve Farrell, PhD, FACSM

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

Cancer is the second leading cause of death among U.S. men and women, accounting for nearly 600,000 deaths each year as well as ~$250 billion in annual health care costs. The top 5 leading causes of cancer death for U.S. men and women1 are shown below in Table 1. Table 1. Leading causes of cancer death in U.S. men and women. Men Annual Number of Deaths Women Annual Number of Deaths Lung ~87,000 Lung ~73,000 Prostate ~28,000 Breast ~40,000 Colorectal ~27,000 Colorectal ~25,000 Pancreatic ~20,000 Pancreatic ~20,000 Liver ~15,000 Ovarian ~14,000 A common statement that I frequently hear is that

0iStock_000042328022_Large_jpg
Written by July 30, 2015

Sue Beckham, PhD

Director of Adult Initiatives
The Cooper Institute

What’s the best strategy for helping others adopt healthier behaviors? These tips will help you to assist that friend, coworker, or family member struggling with change, determine their readiness to change, and nudge them forward in the process. 1. You can facilitate change but you cannot change someone else. An individual must make their own decision to change. You can show your support, but no amount of nagging or coercion will force someone to change if they are not ready. So don’t take on the responsibility for their decisions and actions. Do what you can and realize that the rest is up to

0iStock_000020816103Medium_jpg
Written by July 23, 2015

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Summer is upon us. And here in Texas, that means you stay indoors – a lot. This can be a problem because when you hide inside you’re closer to the fridge and the Laz-E-Boy. Calorie balance can get really out of whack during the summer with vacations, patriotic holidays, and longer daylight hours. Here are ways you can get up and/or get out during the hot months. Remember, when it’s hot outside, your body needs more water. Make sure you stay well-hydrated whether you choose to move indoors or outdoors. Indoor at Home Pop in a favorite physical activity video or DVD and start moving. Get a couple so

food20in20shopping20bag_JPG
Written by July 9, 2015

Steve Farrell, PhD, FACSM

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

Mention the term ‘processed food’ to most people and you will get a very negative response. Processed food gets blamed for a number of chronic health conditions such as prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease, allergies, and some cancers. While there is no question that some processed foods are not the best choices, we need to pause before we overgeneralize. In other words, before jumping on the ‘all processed food is bad’ bandwagon, let’s take a closer look. The technical definition of a processed food is quite broad. Any food product that has undergone a transformation from the raw

backneck
Written by July 7, 2015

Karyn Hughes, MEd

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

There are numerous lifestyle factors related to back and neck pain such as poor posture, improper biomechanics, poor flexibility, muscle weakness, upper body obesity, and smoking.

Taking20Medicine_jpg
Written by July 2, 2015

Steve Farrell, PhD, FACSM

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

If you watch television, you might have seen and heard a “non-attorney spokesperson” plead with persons who have been prescribed statin drugs to call the number provided due to the “dramatic increase in cases of type 2 diabetes caused by statin drugs.” Statin drugs are commonly used to decrease blood levels of LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides, and have been shown to significantly decrease the risk of cardiovascular morbidity (illness) and mortality (death). In an earlier blog, Do Statin Drugs Increase the Risk of Diabetes?, we found that the benefits of reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease by taking a statin were

© 2015 The Cooper Institute / Terms and Conditions / Privacy Policy
Site Design: The Brand Hatchery / Site Development: Canonball Creative