...try a new exercise

From The Cooper Institute and Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

If you can dream it, you can do it. - Walt Disney


2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008
emotions_smiley20face_not20smile_mall_jpg
Written by April 16, 2015

Rachel Huber, MPH, RD

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

It’s National Stress Awareness Day! And, in honor of this day, let’s review an earlier post that examines various stressors that may affect your eating habits. In the past week, have you eaten for reasons other than physical hunger? If you’re like most people, you’d answer, “YES!”. True physical hunger is defined as discomfort, pain, or weakness caused by your body’s need to eat food for energy or fuel. On the other hand, psychological hunger is the desire to eat for nonphysical reasons and is often triggered by the environment around you (external triggers) or your moods and emotions (internal triggers). Which of

wheat_bread_jpg
Written by April 9, 2015

Steve Farrell, PhD, FACSM

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

An earlier blog, Should You Eat Like a Caveman?, covered the rationale behind the Paleo Diet as well as benefits and concerns with this approach. A major emphasis of the Paleo Diet is to avoid grains, including whole grains. Although there is no scientific evidence to support their opinion, Paleo enthusiasts claim that grains ‘cause inflammation’, which leads to an increased risk of chronic disease and early death. Before we take a look at what the science says, let’s review a little bit. All grains contain 3 parts: the bran, germ, and endosperm. A whole grain uses all 3 parts

sleeping girl
Written by April 2, 2015

Merissa Hums, B.S. candidate


Did you know that not getting enough sleep could impact your weight? When we think about trying to not gain weight, often exercising and cutting calories comes to mind; but getting an adequate amount of sleep can also play a role in managing weight. The restorative process of sleep is important for mental, emotional, and physical health. Sleep quality and quantity have been previously linked to obesity in adults and adolescents. So how much sleep is enough? The recommended hours of sleep stated by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute are 7-8 hours for adults and 9-10 hours for

diet20log_apple_tape20measure_XSmall_jpg
Written by March 26, 2015

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

This month, we have learned it’s all about behavior modification – making small changes to daily routines that, hopefully, evolve into healthy lifestyles. As a follow-up, let’s look to a previous post that focuses on adherence to behaviors associated with successful weight loss maintenance. Unbeknownst to many, there are several phases of achieving and maintaining a healthy weight: active weight loss, transition to maintenance of new (lesser) weight, and maintaining the weight loss. The active weight loss phase is often where people put in the most effort, take ”dieting” and exercise to the extremes, and feel pretty good when they lose significant amounts of weight. But experts

Business20Team_jpg
Written by March 19, 2015

Lauren Ruzicka B.S., MPH Candidate


Are you sitting down? If so, I hope that in a few minutes, you’ll be motivated to hop to your feet! You are probably aware of the harms of a sedentary lifestyle – the increased risk for obesity, chronic illness, and a shortened life span – but knowing the tragic facts and figures unfortunately doesn’t solve the problem that so many of us face.1,2 Over 80% of working Americans are in sedentary jobs, and on average these workers are at work 47 hours per week.3 If we’re supposed to be moving more, we’re probably not going to find time…we’re going

coaching 3-12-15
Written by March 12, 2015

Rachel Huber, MPH, RD

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

March is National Nutrition Month. This campaign raises awareness of the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits, which brings to mind an earlier post that encourages healthy behaviors. Year after year national guidelines urge Americans to do physical activity and eat a healthy plant-based diet. And year after year Americans become more sedentary and choose more highly-processed foods high in fat and calories. So what’s the disconnect? Are our healthy messages too complex? Do Americans not see the benefits of a healthy lifestyle? Or, perhaps, are Americans trying to change, but just not using

doctor_exercise_jpg
Written by March 5, 2015

Steve Farrell, PhD, FACSM

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is defined as the body’s maximal ability to transport and utilize oxygen at the tissue level. Results from the Cooper Center Longitudinal Study (CCLS)1 and other large studies, have consistently shown that individuals with low CRF have higher all-cause, cardiovascular disease, and cancer mortality (death) rates than those with moderate CRF, and that the risk continues to decrease when we look at those with high CRF (Figure 1). In the CCLS, low CRF is defined as a treadmill stress test performance in the bottom 20% compared to others of the same age group and gender. This is

Mixed20Nuts_jpg
Written by February 26, 2015

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Happy National Pistachio Day! Pistachios are on my list of favorite nuts, along with almonds, cashews, pecans, and most others. Let’s check out a previous post that highlights the nutritional benefits of nuts. I often get asked the question “what is the best nut for you to eat?” And the answer is…there is no “one” best nut. There are many varieties that carry different benefits. For instance, if you are looking for a good source of vitamin E, then almonds are a good choice. If you are looking for a high level of antioxidants or a source of ALA (alpha-linolenic

sugar cubes 801547_20307911_jpg
Written by February 19, 2015

Steve Farrell, PhD, FACSM

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

If you pay attention to what the media or public says or writes, you would think that dietary high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is the worst villain since Attila the Hun. Although HFCS has been branded by many as a major culprit in the U.S. obesity epidemic, does science really support this view? Let’s take an objective look. HFCS is a liquid sweetener that is used in many foods and beverages, and is often used as an alternative to sucrose (table sugar). The use of HFCS in foods and beverages began in the late 1960s and its use has increased substantially

Girl20with20Heart20Cutouts_jpg[1]
Written by February 12, 2015

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Happy Valentine’s Day weekend! As you consider the heart-shaped candies, red roses, and sweet treats for your loved ones, think about doing something for your heart health, too! Each year since 1963, the President of the United States has proclaimed February as American Heart Month. As the proclamation states, “It is the number one killer of American women and men, and it is a leading cause of serious illness and disability. Across our Nation, we have lost devoted mothers and fathers, loved siblings, and cherished friends to this devastating epidemic.”1 More than 2,200 Americans die of cardiovascular disease each day.

© 2015 The Cooper Institute / Terms and Conditions / Privacy Policy
Site Design: The Brand Hatchery / Site Development: Canonball Creative