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From The Cooper Institute and Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

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When Do You Need More Than Plain Water?
Written by June 18, 2010

Rachel Huber, MPH, RD

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

If you read Monday’s blog you know that high outdoor temperatures and humidity (like we experience here in TX during the summer!) coupled with exercise can lead to extreme dehydration. But, it won’t if you make a conscious effort to stay hydrated before, during, and after your physical activity. How do you do this? Here are the fluid recommendations again: • Start hydrating 4 hours before activity by drinking 2-3 cups (16-24 ounces) of fluid. • If signs of dehydration are present despite this (i.e. not needing to urinate), drink another 1-2 cups (8-16 ounces) 2 hours before activity. • Drink 6-12 ounces every

Hydrating for Physical Activity in the Heat: Don't Wait for a Sprinkler to Save You!
Written by June 14, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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I was out running a few Saturday’s ago and was plagued by extreme thirst. It was in the morning but as it turns out, unknown to me, it was the hottest day we had had this summer, hitting triple digits in the afternoon. So it was already pretty hot when I started out. How hot I didn’t realize until I later checked the temperature and humidity; 88°F, 70% humidity. This put the heat index at close to 100! Humidity, especially when combined with that high of a temperature, reduces the effectiveness of sweating to cool the body by reducing the evaporation

The Tire Flip
Written by June 7, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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One of the popular trends in fitness, functional training was recently discussed. Another popular trend in fitness is the usage of boot camps and other type of fitness classes. Many of these classes use untraditional exercises and functional exercises. One exercise that is sometimes used is the tire flip. This is an exercise that is sometimes seen in strongman events. The exercise normally uses large tires. Many times the tires are from a tractor or other big truck. Individuals crouch down into a low squatted position in front of the tire. Then grab the bottom of one side of the

What Happens When Trans Fats are Taken Out?
Written by June 3, 2010

Rachel Huber, MPH, RD

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

Food manufacturers and restaurants are under increasing pressure to eliminate trans fats, or partially hydrogenated oils from foods. Trans fats, fats created by adding hydrogen to vegetable oil to make it firmer, are heart unhealthy as they raise "bad" LDL-cholesterol, lower "good" HDL-cholesterol, and induce an inflammatory response at even low levels of intake (e.g., 2 to 4% of total calories).  But removing trans fats isn't a simple feat. Trans fats make food products look bigger and better, last longer, and cost less. Cakes, cookies, crackers, bread, and margarine rely heavily on the functionality of partially hydrogenated oils for texture

Make Your Flying Calories Count
Written by May 31, 2010

Rachel Huber, MPH, RD

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

When you are seated in the middle seat of a three-across row on an airplane, you can’t help but see what your row mates are doing – or eating.  As a registered dietitian, observing what people eat is an occupational habit.  (I don’t ever comment on people’s food choices unless asked, however!!)  So on a recent flight, I decided to do an analysis of how my in-flight meal compared to the choices made by my row mates.  My meal Green Tea Au Bon Pain Mediterranean wrap Small bag of dark chocolate M&Ms Neighbor to my left Entire container of Lay’s

Energy Usage of Functional Training
Written by May 28, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

A new type of training referred to as functional training has increased in popularity. Functional training is “multiplaner, multijoint resistance exercises that simulate movement patterns from everyday life and sport.”1 To find exercises for functional training, look at activities in your daily life. Think of squatting down and getting something out of a low cabinet. This can be turned into a functional training exercise in the weight room. To convert the exercise you may add weight by doing a standing low row. You might stand holding onto handles of an adjustable cable pulley with arms extended in front of you.

Satiation, Satiety, and How to Feel Satisfied!
Written by May 27, 2010

Rachel Huber, MPH, RD

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

There is much confusion over satiation, satiety, and what foods to eat if you just "can't get no satisfaction". This blog lays out the basics without going into the biochemical detail. Satiation is the process that ends an eating episode. It controls the meal size and duration. Satiety, on the other hand, is a state of non-hunger and controls subsequent hunger and food intake. Here's the extremely simplified story… When you eat, food is digested and absorbed by your GI tract. Signals are then sent to the part of your brain involved in regulation of energy intake, which stimulates satiation.

Are You Short on Time? Make Weight Training Count!
Written by May 24, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

What if you could burn calories faster while strength training? A recent study1 compared the calories burned during two types of strength training workouts – traditional and superset. Traditional involves completion of one set of repetitions for a specific exercise followed by an inactive rest period. Superset training works two opposing muscle groups before taking a recovery period. Working opposing muscle groups allows the first muscle to rest while the opposing muscle group is working.   The study measured calories burned during the two types of resistance training. Ten active men (average age 22 years and 165 pounds) completed a superset

Not-So-Happy Meal
Written by May 20, 2010

Rachel Huber, MPH, RD

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

Kids in Santa Clara County, California will no longer get toys with their fast food meals per a newly approved proposal which eliminates toys in meals that have more than 485 calories and high levels of fat, sugar, and salt. While implementation of this measure has been delayed a few months to allow fast food restaurants to make kids’ meals more healthful, it’s unlikely that this will happen. Yes, restaurants like McDonalds now offer apple slices instead of fries and low fat milk instead of soda, but even with one of these healthier selections it’ll be tough to meet the

Go Nuts?!?
Written by May 13, 2010

Rachel Huber, MPH, RD

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

Eat 'em, don't eat 'em, eat 'em… that's what we've been told about nuts over the past decade. Once slammed for their high fat and calorie content, nuts are now touted for their LDL (bad) cholesterol lowering effect, healthy fats, fiber, phytosterols, and other antioxidants. Who's to say, though, that next week we won't be told to avoid them again? Well, that's the tricky part about the science of nutrition – it's always changing based on new, better, and more research. But, the evidence behind the benefits of nuts is now pretty strong. Just this month researchers from the Loma

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