...try a new exercise

From The Cooper Institute and Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

You may delay, but time will not. - Benjamin Franklin


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Written by July 24, 2014

Steve Farrell, PhD

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

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It is well-known that obesity and sedentary lifestyle are each strongly associated with all-cause mortality. Among Cooper Clinic patients, cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is measured via a maximal treadmill stress test, while adiposity status is measured via Body Mass Index (BMI), waist circumference, and percent body fat using the 7-site skinfold caliper method. It is not uncommon for an individual to be classified as obese using one measure of adiposity and non-obese using another measure. For example, one might be classified as non-obese when using BMI, but be classified as obese when using waist circumference. We designed a study to examine

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Written by May 22, 2014

Steve Farrell, PhD

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

If you saw the headline ‘dog bites man’, you’d probably just shrug your shoulders because that sort of thing happens every day. Imagine your reaction if you saw the headline ‘man bites dog’. Now that would make for some interesting reading! We have known for decades that higher levels of physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness are each strongly associated with a decreased risk of illness and death. Current public health guidelines call for adults to be physically active for at least 150 minutes per week if working at a moderate intensity, or for at least 75 minutes per week if

More Counseling Works for Weight Loss
Written by March 13, 2014

Steve Farrell, PhD

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

As you are no doubt aware, cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death within  countries with a moderate to high standard of living.  Among the major risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD) are high blood levels of low density lipoprotein (LDL). For over two decades, statins have been the most popular type of drug for lowering LDL cholesterol levels. It is indisputable that lowering LDL decreases the incidence of CHD. Among the mechanisms for plaque development within arteries are oxidative stress caused by free radicals, as well as inflammation. Coenzyme Q10 is a potent antioxidant that helps to

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Written by January 9, 2014

Steve Farrell, PhD

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

Well, it’s January and tens of millions of Americans have resolved once again to lose weight. A considerably smaller number have resolved to exercise more.  So which is more important for health: fitness or fatness?  The Cooper Center Longitudinal Study (CCLS) has been providing a consistent answer to this question for the past two decades. As some of you know, a unique aspect of the CCLS is that it uses an objective measure of cardiorespiratory fitness (the maximal treadmill exercise test) instead of subjective measures such as questionnaires. The CCLS also uses multiple measures of body fatness; body mass index

Summer food, rose colored fish steak in a wine marinade
Written by November 7, 2013

Steve Farrell, PhD

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

 Fish oils are a type of polyunsaturated fatty acid found in moderate to high concentrations in certain fish, as well as other foods. Also known as omega-3 fatty acids, fish oils are classified as being essential; meaning that they must be consumed in the diet in order to survive. DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) and EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) are two of the omega-3 fatty acids that have received the most research attention to date. Most cold and deep water fatty fish contain significant amounts of DHA and EPA. Among them are anchovy, herring, salmon, mackerel, sardines, trout, swordfish, white (albacore) tuna, and

physician with patient
Written by September 5, 2013

Steve Farrell, PhD

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

When we go in for a physical exam that includes blood work, our physician will  typically want to test our blood glucose level. A normal fasting blood glucose level is between 70-99 mg/dl.  Individuals with fasting glucose levels between 100-125 mg/dl on two separate occasions have prediabetes, while individuals with fasting glucose levels >125 mg/dl on two separate occasions have diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association, the prevalence of diabetes in the U.S. is estimated to be 26 million; the prevalence of type 2 diabetes is 10-20 times that of type 1 diabetes. Additionally, there are an estimated 90

Running on treadmill
Written by August 16, 2013

Steve Farrell, PhD

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

Heart failure (HF) is a condition which typically results from a gradual decline in the heart’s ability to pump and fill properly.  It may surprise you to know that HF is the leading cause of hospitalization in the U.S. for individuals ages 65 and older, and accounts for nearly 60,000 deaths annually. There are currently 6 million Americans who are living with heart failure. Well-established risk factors for HF include hypertension, diabetes, age, obesity, smoking, heart valve disease, previous myocardial infarction, and family history of HF. While sedentary lifestyle has also been identified as a risk factor for HF, previous

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Written by April 8, 2013

Steve Farrell, PhD

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

Hypertension is a major public health problem worldwide, with prevalence in the United States estimated at 78 million (33% of the adult population). Because it is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, identification and aggressive treatment of hypertension is of paramount importance. However, because most people with hypertension have no symptoms, it is estimated that 20% of hypertensive individuals are unaware of their condition. Thus, regular monitoring of resting blood pressure is one key for identifying and managing this very common condition. Unless resting blood pressure is severely elevated, lifestyle changes are recommended as the initial treatment strategy for

pills
Written by March 11, 2013

Steve Farrell, PhD

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

Cardiovascular disease (CVD), which is a general term to describe all diseases related to the heart and circulatory system, has been the leading cause of death in the U.S. for the past century. Each year, nearly 1 million Americans die from CVD. Two of the most common types of CVD are coronary heart disease and stroke. Because abnormal blood cholesterol level is a major risk factor for both coronary heart disease and stroke, the discovery of statin drugs in the late 1980’s was a major breakthrough for the prevention and treatment of these two conditions. Statin drugs have powerful lowering

Does Exercise Intensity Matter?
Written by January 14, 2013

Steve Farrell, PhD

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

Although cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been the leading cause of death in the U.S. for over a century, risk factors for CVD were completely unknown as recently as the 1950’s. In fact, heart attack and stroke were thought to be simply a natural consequence of the aging process up until that time! In the late 1940’s, Dr. William Kannel boldly suggested that CVD might be related to behaviors or environmental factors. Accordingly,  the epic Framingham Heart Study was launched in 1948. Residents of Framingham MA were invited to participate in a lifelong research project where they would receive free comprehensive

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