...cut out the soda

From The Cooper Institute and Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

It's easier and more cost effective to maintain good health, than to regain it once it's lost. - Dr. Kenneth H. Cooper


2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008
doctor_exercise_jpg
Written by March 5, 2015

Steve Farrell, PhD, FACSM

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is defined as the body’s maximal ability to transport and utilize oxygen at the tissue level. Results from the Cooper Center Longitudinal Study (CCLS)1 and other large studies, have consistently shown that individuals with low CRF have higher all-cause, cardiovascular disease, and cancer mortality (death) rates than those with moderate CRF, and that the risk continues to decrease when we look at those with high CRF (Figure 1). In the CCLS, low CRF is defined as a treadmill stress test performance in the bottom 20% compared to others of the same age group and gender. This is

sugar cubes 801547_20307911_jpg
Written by February 19, 2015

Steve Farrell, PhD, FACSM

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

If you pay attention to what the media or public says or writes, you would think that dietary high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is the worst villain since Attila the Hun. Although HFCS has been branded by many as a major culprit in the U.S. obesity epidemic, does science really support this view? Let’s take an objective look. HFCS is a liquid sweetener that is used in many foods and beverages, and is often used as an alternative to sucrose (table sugar). The use of HFCS in foods and beverages began in the late 1960s and its use has increased substantially

Overweight
Written by December 18, 2014

Steve Farrell, PhD, FACSM

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

If you are under the age of 40 or so, you might not understand the Dr. Seuss reference in the title of this article. I just couldn’t help myself. Many years ago, it was assumed not only that all fat cells were alike, but also that fat cells were simply storage facilities for fat; and not active metabolically. More recently, we have learned that nothing could be further from the truth. Everybody’s probably familiar with white fat because that’s the type of fat cell we find ~98% of the time in the human body.  It’s also the type of fat

Contemporary20Health20179_jpg
Written by October 9, 2014

Steve Farrell, PhD, FACSM

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

As you might have heard, vitamin D is nicknamed ‘the sunshine vitamin’. Skin exposure to the sun’s ultraviolet rays triggers a metabolic pathway which ultimately results in production of the active form of vitamin D. In the past, it was thought that the only important function of vitamin D was to increase absorption of calcium and phosphorus from the gut into the blood. By increasing blood levels of these two minerals, they become more available to the bones. More recently, it has become more clear that improving bone health is just the tip of the iceberg with regard to the

Salmon20Dinner_jpg
Written by September 11, 2014

Steve Farrell, PhD, FACSM

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

In a previous post we discussed the relationship between cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) level and future risk of dying from heart failure (HF)1. Specifically, higher levels of CRF significantly decreased the risk of HF death in a group of nearly 45,000 men who were followed for an average of 20 years. In two other posts, one in 2013 and one earlier this year, we wrote about some of the cardiovascular and mental health benefits of increased dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3’s are commonly known as fish oils, but are also found in plant-based foods such as walnuts. The most

running20on20treadmill_jpg
Written by July 24, 2014

Steve Farrell, PhD, FACSM

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

It is well-known that obesity and sedentary lifestyle are each strongly associated with all-cause mortality. Among Cooper Clinic patients, cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is measured via a maximal treadmill stress test, while adiposity status is measured via Body Mass Index (BMI), waist circumference, and percent body fat using the 7-site skinfold caliper method. It is not uncommon for an individual to be classified as obese using one measure of adiposity and non-obese using another measure. For example, one might be classified as non-obese when using BMI, but be classified as obese when using waist circumference. We designed a study to examine

dueling_flexing_biceps_female20and20male_XSmall_jpg
Written by May 22, 2014

Steve Farrell, PhD, FACSM

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

If you saw the headline ‘dog bites man’, you’d probably just shrug your shoulders because that sort of thing happens every day. Imagine your reaction if you saw the headline ‘man bites dog’. Now that would make for some interesting reading! We have known for decades that higher levels of physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness are each strongly associated with a decreased risk of illness and death. Current public health guidelines call for adults to be physically active for at least 150 minutes per week if working at a moderate intensity, or for at least 75 minutes per week if

More Counseling Works for Weight Loss
Written by March 13, 2014

Steve Farrell, PhD, FACSM

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

As you are no doubt aware, cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death within  countries with a moderate to high standard of living.  Among the major risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD) are high blood levels of low density lipoprotein (LDL). For over two decades, statins have been the most popular type of drug for lowering LDL cholesterol levels. It is indisputable that lowering LDL decreases the incidence of CHD. Among the mechanisms for plaque development within arteries are oxidative stress caused by free radicals, as well as inflammation. Coenzyme Q10 is a potent antioxidant that helps to

legs-of-a-young-man-running
Written by January 9, 2014

Steve Farrell, PhD, FACSM

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

Well, it’s January and tens of millions of Americans have resolved once again to lose weight. A considerably smaller number have resolved to exercise more.  So which is more important for health: fitness or fatness?  The Cooper Center Longitudinal Study (CCLS) has been providing a consistent answer to this question for the past two decades. As some of you know, a unique aspect of the CCLS is that it uses an objective measure of cardiorespiratory fitness (the maximal treadmill exercise test) instead of subjective measures such as questionnaires. The CCLS also uses multiple measures of body fatness; body mass index

Summer food, rose colored fish steak in a wine marinade
Written by November 7, 2013

Steve Farrell, PhD, FACSM

Science Officer
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

 Fish oils are a type of polyunsaturated fatty acid found in moderate to high concentrations in certain fish, as well as other foods. Also known as omega-3 fatty acids, fish oils are classified as being essential; meaning that they must be consumed in the diet in order to survive. DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) and EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) are two of the omega-3 fatty acids that have received the most research attention to date. Most cold and deep water fatty fish contain significant amounts of DHA and EPA. Among them are anchovy, herring, salmon, mackerel, sardines, trout, swordfish, white (albacore) tuna, and

© 2015 The Cooper Institute / Terms and Conditions / Privacy Policy
Site Design: The Brand Hatchery / Site Development: Canonball Creative