...try a new exercise

From The Cooper Institute and Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

Where there's a will, there's a way. - English Proverb


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power_fitness20walking_jpg
Written by April 17, 2014

Michael Harper, MEd

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

Low impact cardiovascular activities can help to minimize the risk of injury. However, low impact activities such as walking are sometimes perceived as not having as many options for increasing caloric burn. Fortunately, incorporating interval training with walking can help increase caloric expenditure. Plus, walking is an activity that requires no equipment, is easy to do, and is one of the most natural forms of physical activity. Interval training involves bouts of higher intensity exercise mixed with periods of lower intensity exercise that allows for partial recovery. More calories are burned at higher intensities when compared to lower intensities of

exhausted20after20workout_jpg[2]
Written by February 20, 2014

Michael Harper, MEd

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

The use of ropes as fitness equipment has been on the rise in gyms. Ropes, often called battle ropes, similar looking to the ones used at one time for climbing in PE classes, are now being used for a variety of other exercises. The ropes are normally between 30 – 50 feet in length, 1 -2 inches in thickness, and anchored around a pole so an individual can hold both ends of the rope. Thicker and longer ropes will make exercises more advanced. Examples of common repeated movements using battle ropes include the following exercises: Alternating Waves: In a stable

group ball back extension
Written by August 8, 2013

Michael Harper, MEd

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

What are the first things you think of when you hear someone talk about working the “core”? Crunches Sit-ups Abs The list could go on with similar exercises, but if these, and others like them, are the only exercises used, you may be not be working a significant part of the core. The core has been defined (Wilkerson, et al., 2012) as: The lumbopelvic-hip complex, which is composed of the lumbar vertebrae, pelvis, and hip joints and the active and passive structures that either produce or restrict movements of these segments. In short, or easier to understand terms, the core

male and female running_jpg
Written by July 11, 2013

Michael Harper, MEd

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

After a long run, the last thing many runners think about is hitting the gym for a lower body weight routine. However, research indicates that it may be worth rethinking. Most of the time, the benefits of running and other forms of exercise outweigh the risks.  As was discussed in the blog, Exercise: Why Risk the Injury, active individuals have a 17%-19% lower chance of injury during non-sport or non-leisure time activities than those who are inactive.  Nonetheless, injuries still exist in activity (Howard, 2011). The knee joint is the most often injured joint for runners (Taunten, 2002), two common

dumbbells
Written by May 6, 2013

Michael Harper, MEd

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

For additional health benefits not provided by aerobic exercise, it is recommended that most adults perform regular muscle-strengthening or resistance training.  What is considered “regular”? The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans state that adults should perform muscular strength and endurance activities on a minimum of 2 days per week (Haskell, et al, 2007). On each of these days, individuals should perform 8 -10 exercises with 8 -12 repetitions. During these exercises, individuals should work against resistance, which can come in many different forms including body weight, resistance bands, dumbbells, barbells and many other apparatuses. Using elastic resistance bands, or one’s

man massaging knee pain_2
Written by April 2, 2013

Michael Harper, MEd

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

When thinking of bad knees, the term osteoarthritis often comes to mind. Osteoarthritis is a degenerative condition of the cartilage of synovial joints, commonly affecting the knee joint, and is relatively pervasive in society today, including in those with an athletic and active lifestyle. While athletic activity does not have a cause and effect relationship with osteoarthritis, traumatic injury often resulting from athletic pursuits can increase the likelihood of its occurrence, which I think may explain the issues that have plagued me and my knees. Currently I have been able to manage the effects of osteoarthritis and have been able

Man Working in Garden
Written by March 4, 2013

Michael Harper, MEd

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

While much of the nation still has snow on the ground, I have already begun making preparations for my springtime garden here in Dallas, TX. As I began getting the soil ready for planting, I found myself even huffing and puffing a little bit as I turned the soil. I also found myself squatting down and standing back up enough times to make me curious how much physical activity and benefit I was getting during my gardening adventures. As you are probably aware, physical activity is important for our health and may also be important for maintaining, or decreasing, bodyweight.

jump
Written by January 6, 2013

Michael Harper, MEd

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

As you jump into the New Year, along with your New Year’s resolutions, consider adding changes to your exercise routine to keep it fresh and new. Recently we discussed what the effect of just changing your music can have on your workout in the article “Singing the Workout Blues.” While changing your music takes very little effort, changing your routine may take a little work but often it is well worth the effort. One possibility is to add in plyometric training which is basically jump training. Plyometrics can easily be incorporated into your exercise routine as long as you have

running a race_JPG
Written by December 4, 2012

Michael Harper, MEd

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

As I finish my preparations for the Dallas Marathon this coming weekend, I am looking forward to seeing the results of all my training. As you can probably imagine, that training has burned a large number of calories, and I still have some more to burn come race day!  As we have shared previously, during the Denver Marathon over 34 million calories were burned during the race. WOW! Of course those weren’t by just one person, and calorie burn varies by a number of factors, one of which is weight. If you are curious, click here and you can do

Older Asian man walking in park
Written by October 1, 2012

Michael Harper, MEd

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

The metropolitan area of Minneapolis-St. Paul claimed the crown as the fittest metropolitan area in the country in 2012 according to the annual American Fitness Index.1 The report reflects a composite of community indicators for preventive health behaviors, levels of chronic disease conditions, access to health care, community supports and policies for physical activity.

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