...think healthier

From The Cooper Institute and Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

Don't think, just do. - Horace


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Written by January 22, 2015

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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As we eagerly prepare our gym bags and raw veggies in support of our 2015 resolutions to exercise and watch what we eat (you are still at them right?!), I flash back to a previous discussion on training expectations that will come in handy as we move forward with our goals. When setting expectations for your results with exercise training it is important to consider the “window of adaptation.” Whenever you begin something new, you have a very large window of adaptation meaning there is a great potential to see significant (and often large) increases in performance. As you become

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Written by January 8, 2015

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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It’s only January 8th but doesn’t it seem like those New Year’s resolutions are already a thing of the past? Unfortunately for many, their good intentions have already been abandoned. If you are still on the path to trying to make healthy changes here are some suggestions on how to make those changes lasting. Ask yourself: Do you really want to make this change? We often decide to make a change because someone else is going to, or suggests that we should (or because that is what you do at the start of a new year) but the decision to

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Written by December 11, 2014

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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What are your plans to maintain your fitness routine this holiday season and keep those calories in balance? This hasn’t crossed your mind yet? Not to worry – an earlier post reminds us of some simple, but realistic ways to stay fit during the upcoming food- and drink-filled festivities. In a typical day 60-70% of all calories burned are for basic body needs including sleeping and awakening. Then 10% of the calories you use are for the digestion of food and 15-30% are used during physical activity.1 To maintain your current weight calories taken in must equal calories used. The good news

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Written by November 13, 2014

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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Are you one of those people who routinely exercises at least three hours a week – but also spends most of your days sitting behind a desk? It’s awesome to achieve the recommended minutes for physical activity each week, but an earlier blog encourages those who are sedentary throughout the day to move more as exercise alone might not be enough for their health. Most individuals recognize that  physical inactivity has been shown to increase the number of deaths from all-causes, as well as from heart disease and cancer. But what about individuals who meet the physical activity recommendations but spend

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Written by October 30, 2014

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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Does it ever seem like you just don’t have enough time to do all you need to do — or want to do — including making healthy lifestyle changes? Unfortunately, there are only so many minutes in an hour, hours in a day, and days in a week. In our busy and fast-paced lives, it’s often difficult to accomplish all we have to do in the time we have available and this can be a big source of stress. While most would agree that stress can be unpleasant (to say the least), many do not realize the affect stress has

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Written by October 16, 2014

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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Just how flexible are you? Have you ever taken the “Sit and Reach” test?  It is a basic physical fitness assessment that evaluates the flexibility of the hamstrings and glutes.  It is believed by many that a good score on this assessment generally indicates good overall flexibility although it is important to keep in mind that flexibility is joint specific. Improving flexibility is associated with improved range of motion, improved circulation, and reduced tension just to name a few. My sit and reach test results inspired me to set some flexibility goals and to share an earlier post that presented evidence

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Written by October 2, 2014

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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Did you know that pumpkins are at their peak in October? You may have noticed the pumpkin patches that have popped up in your neighborhood or in your local market. A previous post pops to mind with the various (and yummy!) ways to incorporate pumpkin into your healthy eating habits. My first experience eating pumpkin other than in breads, desserts, and pumpkin soup, was having it grilled with a little bit of olive oil and balsamic vinegar drizzled on top. Oh my goodness, it was heavenly. It made me realize that there was much more to pumpkin than I had realized.

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Written by September 25, 2014

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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High-risk situations such as increased work hours, periods of stress, or even bad weather have the potential to cause even the most committed exerciser or healthy eater to slip back into unhealthy habits. It’s important to think about the situations, events, people, thoughts, and feelings that may keep you from achieving or maintaining your goals. Once you identify high risk situations, you can build a plan to deal with them in positive and helpful ways. As the saying goes, “When the going gets tough, the tough get going!” Below are some challenging situations that people often face when making changes

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Written by September 18, 2014

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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Fall is nearly upon us. The shorter days, changing foliage, and decrease in temperatures means a rapidly growing to-do list around the house. You know like cleaning the garage, storing items in the attic, and raking the leaves. These to-do’s are considered lifestyle physical activities, which are important to our health. In a previous post we discussed how a regular exercise program alone may not be enough of a protection if you spend a good portion of your day sitting. As a reminder, research has demonstrated a dose-response association between sitting time and mortality from all causes, independent of leisure

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Written by September 4, 2014

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

Today is the NFL season opener between the reigning Super Bowl Champion Seattle Seahawks and the Green Bay Packers. Football season brings fun and excitement but it also brings hours of sitting and lots of food and drinks, which can pose a challenge to our weight loss or weight maintenance efforts. Let’s revisit some tips we have posted in the past that hopefully will help you to engage in healthy behaviors while allowing you to enjoy the greatness that football season is! Schedule a time to be active. No, jumping up in excitement and then sitting back down doesn’t count—well maybe

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