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    Monthly Archives: November 2011

circuit_training_firefighters
Written by November 28, 2011

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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Firefighters face challenging physical stresses on the job. These include anaerobic activities which can produce significant levels of lactic acid (6-13 mmol/L)2 while also targeting the cardiovascular system requiring heart rates of 79-88% of maximum3,4. For this reason, circuit training where cardio and strength stations are alternated with short rest periods between is often a popular training option for firefighters to target both aerobic and anaerobic conditioning systems. But does circuit training stimulate aerobic and anaerobic energy systems enough to meet the demands of firefighting? To answer this question, Mark Abel and his colleagues1 measured the heart rate response and

medical_weigh_counceling
Written by November 25, 2011

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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Last month we blogged about a research article that showed that behaviorally-based treatments for obesity are effective whether offered within or outside of a clinical (e.g., doctor's office) setting. But what exactly should a "behaviorally-based treatment" be comprised of? A new study compared weight loss over a 2-year period in response to three lifestyle interventions delivered by primary care providers with other health professionals (i.e., lifestyle coaches):1 Intervention I – Usual care, consisting of quarterly primary care provider visits that included education about weight management. Specifically, providers spent 5-7 minutes reviewing the patient's weight change and discussing the NHLBI's Aim

readytozumba
Written by November 21, 2011

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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For the sixth consecutive year the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) released its 2012 Worldwide Survey of Fitness Trends.1 The key to this list is that ACSM’s survey makes a clear distinction between trends and fads. "A ‘Trend' is a general development or change in a situation or in the way that people are behaving” (http://dictionary.cambridge.org). Whereas a ‘Fad’  is defined as "a fashion that is taken up with great enthusiasm for a brief period” (http://dictionary.reference.com). This is an important distinction, because fitness club managers and fitness leaders must plan and commit resources for each new year’s programming and

Spice Up Your Holiday Meals
Written by November 18, 2011

Rachel Huber, MPH, RD

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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This time of year we're more focused on festivities, family, and friends and less focused on our health. That comes in January, right?! With a little help from herbs and spices, however, you might be able to tackle both. Herbs (from plants and plant parts) and spices (from the seeds, berries, bark, or roots of plants) have long been used for their flavor-enhancing and medicinal properties. But over time many people have narrowed their food flavorings to salt and pepper and become accustomed to bland foods. Research suggests, however, that we start using herbs and spices again for these health benefits1: Antioxidants. Herbs and spices have some

sitting_tv
Written by November 14, 2011

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

Studies have shown that smoking just one cigarette reduces your life by eleven minutes1. Probably not surprising but what if I told you that the seemingly harmless pastime of watching TV also reduces your life expectancy—surprised? Researchers from Australia have estimated that every hour of television watched after the age of 25 is associated with a twenty-two minute reduction in average life expectancy2. Based on their calculations, an adult who spends an average of six hours per day watching TV can expect to live 4.8 years fewer than someone who does not watch TV. Sedentary behavior has long been associated

weightloss_familyaffair
Written by November 11, 2011

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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Several recent blog posts have presented the weight loss benefits of cognitive-behavioral treatment programs…

morethanstrengthening
Written by November 7, 2011

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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Strengthening the small, often neglected stabilizer muscles of the shoulder like we talked about in the “Best Kept Secrets of the Shoulder” can help protect the shoulder but may not be the full solution.

How Frequently Should You Eat?
Written by November 4, 2011

Rachel Huber, MPH, RD

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

“I only eat one meal a day. How can I possibly be gaining weight?” While it seems like eating only one meal a day would result in negative calorie balance (expending more calories than consuming) and weight loss, recent research shows the opposite.1 Leading weight loss researchers analyzed data on eating frequency (self-reported meals and snacks consumed per day) and physical activity in weight loss maintainers who had reduced from overweight/obese to normal weight, normal weight individuals, and overweight individuals. Results showed: Self-reported physical activity was highest in weight loss maintainers followed by normal weight, and then overweight individuals. Number of

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