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From The Cooper Institute and Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

The time is always right to do what is right. - Martin Luther King, Jr.


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    Monthly Archives: September 2011

Parents Don't Want Childrens' Doctors to Use the Words 'Fat' or 'Obese'
Written by September 30, 2011

Ruth Ann Carpenter, MS, RD

Lead Integrator
Health Integration, LLC

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When discussing excess weight with children, researchers found that parents prefer that doctors use the terms “weight” and “unhealthy weight” rather than “fat,” “obese,” and “extremely obese.” Parents perceive the latter terms are stigmatizing, blaming, and the least likely way to motivate children to lose weight.1 Weight stigmatization, or bias, is common in health care settings.2 And while parents report that the physician’s office is the best place to seek treatment for their child’s weight, some parents also report feeling blamed by providers for their children’s excess weight.3 Thus, researchers set out to determine which weight-based terms were preferred by

Resistance Training Guidelines for Kids
Written by September 26, 2011

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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Policy making and health research organizations like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)1, National Strength and Conditioning Association4, American College of Sports Medicine2 and Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology3 have all endorsed resistance training for youth. When performed appropriately with proper supervision, studies show that resistance training can increase bone density, muscular strength and endurance, body composition, and athletic performance. Studies also suggest that resistance training can boost confidence and self-esteem in children. Resistance training programs should consider the child’s age, fitness level, mental and physical maturity, training experience, and health status. Generally, if a child is

dontforgetwhite
Written by September 23, 2011

Rachel Huber, MPH, RD

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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A simple way to eat healthier is to fill your plate with a variety of colorful fruits and vegetables. What many people forget, however, is that white is a color! And researchers recently found that fruits and vegetables whose edible sections are white may lower risk of stroke more than other fruits and vegetables. Dutch researchers analyzed data collected from over 20,000 initially healthy people (showed no signs of cardiovascular disease) between the ages of 20 and 65. The study volunteers completed a lengthy questionnaire on their usual intake of commonly consumed fruits and vegetables including juices and sauces. Then researchers followed

seniorexercise
Written by September 19, 2011

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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Over 1,800 older adults from 12 different intervention sites who had previously been inactive, participated in a behavior change program called Active for Life(R). This program was developed, in part, by The Cooper Institute and is a proven, evidence-based behavioral program for exercise.1 Recently, Renee Umstattd, assistant professor of health education at Baylor University, Waco, Texas reviewed the Active for Life research and found a very interesting, internal motivation trend for these seniors.2 Read on. Satisfaction with Appearance or Body Function: Each participant was given a survey to determine satisfaction with their appearance and satisfaction with their body’s function. Initially, most reported they were “a little dissatisfied” or “neutral” regarding their

Dieters Lose Weight When Their Doctors Send Them to Weight Watchers
Written by September 16, 2011

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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A new study published in the Lancet showed that overweight patients told by their doctors to go to Weight Watchers lost twice as much weight as patients who received standard weight loss care over 12 months.1 Researchers in London randomized 772 overweight or obese adults to either 12 months of standard care (weight loss advice from their practitioner based on national clinical guidelines) or 12 months of free membership to Weight Watchers (a commercial program that promotes a low-calorie, balanced diet with increased physical activity and group support). In both groups, body weight, height, fat mass, waist circumference, and blood

stopsmoking_exercise
Written by September 12, 2011

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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Have you tried to quit smoking but been unsuccessful? Well you are not alone. In this country 70% of adult smokers report that they want to quit, yet research shows that it takes the average smoker up to ten attempts to permanently stop this unhealthy behavior.1 Even with medical assistance such as nicotine replacement therapy or the aid of counseling, success rates are still relatively low. Sounds pretty dim but there is hope and not surprising (or at least not surprising to me!) it comes in the form of EXERCISE. Recently researchers have looked into the effect of combining exercise

picking_fall_produce
Written by September 9, 2011

Rachel Huber, MPH, RD

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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According to the weather forecasters here in Dallas we’re experiencing “fall-like” temperatures – mid 80s! While the first day of fall isn’t for two more weeks, it’s a good time to start planning your fall menus. Freshen up your recipes using produce that’s particularly good in September, October, and November. Apples – firm, crisp, full color with no bruises, soft spots or shriveled skins Chop and toss into a green salad Slice and dip in yogurt Peel, chop, boil, mash, and season with a little maple syrup and cinnamon Pears – firm but yield to gentle pressure, without bruises, and not

exerciseandheat
Written by September 5, 2011

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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Summer approached a tad too quickly this year in Dallas. Records have been broken, heat indices and temperatures have sky rocketed, and all the while, precipitation has been non- existent. Unfortunately, these weather patterns affect daily activities, including physical activity. Have you found yourself grabbing your mail as you drive by your mailbox instead of waiting and walking to retrieve it later, or abandoning your outdoors workout for the comfort of your air conditioning? Or are you a native Texan that believes that everything is bigger, better, and stronger in TX; therefore, you run during peak temperatures while wearing a

newweightloss_tool
Written by September 2, 2011

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

For weight loss, many practitioners take the energy balance approach. It's commonly recommended to increase energy (calorie) expenditure and decrease energy (calorie) intake so the body uses stored energy (body fat) to provide the energy that is needed, but not immediately available from food, resulting in a negative energy balance. Since one pound of body fat stores approximately 3,500 calories, it takes a 3,500-calorie deficit to achieve an average weight loss of one pound of body weight. And a 3,500-calorie negative calorie balance could be achieved in one week by: • Cutting calorie intake by 500 calories per day (7 days x 500 calories = 3,500

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