...cut out the soda

From The Cooper Institute and Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

Take action every day - some small dose at a time. - Jeffrey Gitomer


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    Monthly Archives: July 2010

What's the Buzz on Caffeine and Kids?
Written by July 30, 2010

Rachel Huber, MPH, RD

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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  Enter a coffee shop and you’ll see a group of teens sipping lattés. Drive by a high school sporting event and you’ll see kids slamming energy drinks. Or cross through a park and you’ll see a few children drinking soda pops. Kids and caffeinated beverages have become the norm. But is it okay? According to a recent editorial in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, the answer is no. Excessive caffeine in kids can cause nervousness, irritability, sleeplessness, and occasionally rapid heart rate. And way too many caffeine-laden products are marketed to children through advertising and sponsorship of events like

Treadmill vs. Elliptical: Which is a Better Workout?
Written by July 26, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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  Are all cardio machines created equally? Studies have shown that when individuals exercise on different pieces of cardio equipment at the same self-selected effort level, some pieces of equipment result in greater calorie burn. For example, at the same self-selected effort level, most individuals burn more calories exercising on the treadmill compared to the rowing machine, stair stepper, cycle ergometer or cross-country ski machine. However, until recently, newer forms of exercise equipment like the elliptical machine have not been investigated. A study published in Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research1 examined whether you burn more calories on the elliptical

Achieving and Maintaining a Healthy Lifestyle - What Really Works?
Written by July 23, 2010

Rachel Huber, MPH, RD

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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Year after year national guidelines urge Americans to do physical activity and eat a healthy plant-based diet. And year after year Americans become more sedentary and choose more highly-processed foods high in fat and calories. So what’s the disconnect? Are our healthy messages too complex? Do Americans not see the benefits of a healthy lifestyle? Or, perhaps, are Americans trying to change, but just not using the right strategies? This week the American Heart Association released a Scientific Statement titled, Interventions to Promote Physical Activity and Dietary Lifestyle Change for Cardiovascular Risk Factor Reduction in Adults. After reviewing dozens of physical activity and

Do Compression Garments Enhance Exercise Recovery?
Written by July 19, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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Each exercise workout and sport competition can result in various magnitudes of physiological and psychological changes such as increased soft tissue damage (causing muscle soreness), increased fatigue, increased core temperatures, and altered mood.  How rapidly one recovers is influenced by factors such as genetics, diet, fitness level, sleep, environment, and winning or losing.  The exercise demands and the recovery processes are specifically related to the stressors the athlete is exposed to.  Recovery is so important that historically legal and illegal restoration techniques have been used by athletes; anything to get an edge. Examples are the use of anabolic drugs, over-the-counter

Are Baby and Toddler Foods Healthier Than Their Adult Equivalents? PART 2 - Sodium
Written by July 16, 2010

Rachel Huber, MPH, RD

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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If you read last week’s blog you learned that prepared baby and toddler foods are often high in sugar, particularly added sugar. And as previously mentioned, because infancy and toddlerhood is a critical time period for forming taste preferences and possibly preventing future disease, the need for caretakers to take steps to limit these products is high. This week, we’re revealing the findings on SODIUM content of baby and toddler foods from the same research study (see last week’s blog for information on what products were analyzed).1 As we did with sugar, let’s start with the sodium recommendations. The American Academy

Put Activity Back into Life
Written by July 12, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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I was running up and down the street in front of my house one day because I had to stay close to home. A neighbor down the street was out washing his cars so every time I passed him we would exchange some quick words about this and that. During one of my passes he made the comment that he should be out running. I didn’t have time to respond but I thought about this comment for the next few minutes. He had been out washing his cars (as well as the neighbor’s) as long as I had been running

Are Baby and Toddler Foods Healthier Than Their Adult Equivalents? PART 1 - Sugar
Written by July 9, 2010

Rachel Huber, MPH, RD

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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If you read our recent blog on the 2010 Dietary Guidelines you know that added sugar and sodium are two dietary components that Americans are eating WAY too much of. While there are differing opinions as to why we’re eating too much, it’s clear that this is a problem in not only adults, but also children. This is concerning because research shows that dietary habits are formed early in life and persist over time. Furthermore, studies show that the composition of early childhood diet may directly impact metabolic pathways and health during adulthood. Thus, it’s imperative that we feed our children the

Brush and Brush, again!
Written by July 5, 2010

Ruth Ann Carpenter, MS, RD

Lead Integrator
Health Integration, LLC

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It’s time to make physical activity as routine as brushing our teeth! Did you know that research is starting to show that oral hygiene along with exercise may help reduce cardiovascular (CV) disease? A recent blog, “Physically Active with a Sedentary Lifestyle: Are you at risk?,”explored the effects of prolonged sitting on all-cause and CV death rates in individuals who exercised and those who did not1.  Researchers reported the highest death rates in persons who spent most of the day sitting and those who spent more time sitting.  And this was true even if they met their recommended PA requirements. 

Obesity Rates Still Rising
Written by July 2, 2010

Ruth Ann Carpenter, MS, RD

Lead Integrator
Health Integration, LLC

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A recent report shows that adult obesity rates rose in 28 states during the past year and now exceed 25 percent in more than two-thirds of the states! Furthermore, while 4 states last year had obesity rates over 30 percent (Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, West Virginia), 8 states now have that distinction (4 previously mentioned states plus Louisiana, Kentucky, Oklahoma, and Arkansas). This report, F is in Fat 2010: How the Obesity Crisis Threatens America's Future published by Trust for America's Health (TFAH) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) this week, shows that while steps have been taken to address the

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