...think healthier

From The Cooper Institute and Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

You can do what you have to do, and sometimes you can do it even better than you think you can. - Jimmy Carter


2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008
    Monthly Archives: April 2010

Can You Cook?
Written by April 29, 2010

Rachel Huber, MPH, RD

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

"Save America's cooking skills!" "Improving food literacy!" Everyone from nutritionists and obesity researchers to chefs are starting to shouting these slogans. Why? Because many Americans can't cook, resulting in a dinner choice of either eating out (often fast food) or packaged, convenience food (often high in fat, salt, and calories). Researchers in Australia (Queensland University of Technology) are leading a research project to study food literacy in young adults (16-26 years old) and how to improve them. Specifically, they're defining food literacy as a "combination of food choices, shopping, and cooking" and looking at what food skills people need to be healthy and how measure and influence

Catching ZZZZs To Prevent Obesity
Written by April 28, 2010

Ruth Ann Carpenter, MS, RD

Lead Integrator
Health Integration, LLC

Comments 0

The more time you spend laying in bed asleep the fewer calories you burn and thus, the greater your risk for overweight and obesity.  Right? That may seem logical but that is not what the research is showing.  In fact, a growing body of scientific literature suggests that sleep duration is inversely related to obesity.  That is, with increasing hours of sleep, obesity risk goes down.  To a point.  What studies have found so far is that sleeping on average less than seven hours per night increases obesity risk.1 But sleep duration of longer than eight or nine hours per

Does Exercise Make You Hungry?
Written by April 26, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

Does Exercise Make Us Hungry? There has been much debate about the effect of exercise on appetite and energy intake.  Although some scientists have proposed that exercise stimulates appetite; most studies do not support this finding.  A recent study published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise4 examined the effect of walking on appetite and food intake.  In the study, subjects participated in two different trials – an exercise and a nonexercise (control) trial.  One day subjects walked for 60 minutes on a treadmill with some mild shortness of breath but were still able to hold a conversation.  On

Serving Your Family "Healthy" Foods May Not Be Helpful
Written by April 22, 2010

Rachel Huber, MPH, RD

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

New research out of the University of Chicago suggests that eating foods labeled as "healthy" makes some people hungrier (and eat more!) than eating foods labeled as "tasty" or not eating at all. Thus, researchers suggest that if you're trying to encourage a family member to lose weight it's best not to focus on the healthfulness of the foods you serve. A series of studies were performed to examine how imposed healthy eating influenced individuals' experienced hunger. In one study, research subjects were all given the same protein bar and told their job was to taste a food that was described as either healthy or tasty (imposed conditions) or

Pedometer Use: Adding to What We Know Already Works
Written by April 19, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

Gilbert R. Kaats, Ph.D. is passionate about health enhancing products and has researched them over the past 32 years.  This blog is a summary of his research and findings regarding the usefulness of pedometers.1  The concept is simple as related by Kessinger in the December 2007 issue of The Original Internist “…Find what works, make sure it works, and then add to it; re-tool one good idea with another. Never take away from what works. Always add to it.” 2 Pedometers work; they serve to increase physical activity and “…the device is a great little motivator.” Says Dr. Dena Bravata.

Mobile Apps to Whet the Calorie Balancer's Appetite
Written by April 15, 2010

Rachel Huber, MPH, RD

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

If you're an owner of an iPhone, iPad, Palm, Blackberry, Android, or other smartphone or mobile device you're likely a fan of apps (short for software applications). While games remain the number one downloaded and used application, apps for mobile shopping, social networking, and utility/productivity tools are gaining in popularity.   We've created a brief list of apps that may help you achieve calorie balance. Please comment on any of these apps and suggest other apps that you've found to help you decrease calories in and/or increase calories out. With over 100,000 apps available at Apple's App Store (not to mention the thousands

Keep A Sharp Mind By Minding Your Blood Pressure
Written by April 14, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

Ninety percent of Americans will have high blood pressure by the time they kick the bucket.  One-half of Americans over the age of 60 currently have high blood pressure.  The fact that high blood pressure increases risk for stroke and heart disease makes it something everyone should pay attention to.  The urgency is compounded by the more recent findings that high blood pressure is associated with increased risk for dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.  Changes in diet, increased physical activity, weight loss, and of course, medications have been shown to reduce blood pressure.  But the prevalence of high blood pressure and

Shoes or No Shoes?
Written by April 12, 2010

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

With the arrival of spring you may have seen some people out running without any shoes on or wearing something that looks like a glove on their feet. Well the latest buzz around the fitness industry is—yes, you guessed it—barefoot running. While barefoot running is in the spotlight now, it actually has been around for quite some time. The running shoe wasn’t invented until the 1970’s so this is a relatively new piece of equipment when you look at how long humans have been running. And even since the running shoe emerged, the trend of barefoot running has come around

Keep 'Em Crunchy!
Written by April 8, 2010

Rachel Huber, MPH, RD

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Comments 0

As a dietitian and parent of a picky eater I am often distraught over the vegetables that go untouched on my child's plate. I've read many good books that describe how to feed your child so he/she will eat (and like!) healthy foods, but vegetables is one food group that I just can't seem to conquer. Despite the variety and great number of times I offer vegetables, my child just won't touch them – not even peas, corn, or potatoes! Recently, however, we've had one success – raw carrots. Recent research from Wageningen University (the Netherlands) has given me some insights into what I might

Does Topical Gel Reduce Muscle Soreness Post-Exercise?
Written by April 5, 2010

Ruth Ann Carpenter, MS, RD

Lead Integrator
Health Integration, LLC

Comments 0

Most people experience muscle soreness 24 to 48 hours after a new exercise program. Individuals have tried everything from massage, ultrasound and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) such as ibuprofen and aspirin to help reduce muscle soreness. Oral NSAID drugs are the most commonly used anti-inflammatory but may have gastrointestinal side effects. A topical (medication applied directly to the skin) anti-inflammatory version of ibuprofen was recently tested to determine if it decreases muscle soreness. It is thought that the topical application would eliminate the gastrointestinal side effects associated with oral ibuprofen. The study “Effects of Ibuprofen Topical Gel on Muscle Soreness”

© 2014 The Cooper Institute / Terms and Conditions / Privacy Policy
Site Design: The Brand Hatchery / Site Development: Canonball Creative