...cut out the soda

From The Cooper Institute and Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

The time for action is now. It's never too late to do something. - Carl Sandburg


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How Does Your State Rate?
Written by October 8, 2009

Rachel Huber, MPH, RD

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

Tags
fruits
healthy eating
vegetables
How Does Your State Rate?

Healthy People 2010 is a set of disease prevention and health promotion objectives for the nation to achieve from 2000-2010. Created by scientists, Healthy People 2010 identifies a wide range of public health priorities including heart disease and stroke, cancer, diabetes, nutrition and overweight, and physical activity and fitness. Individuals, groups, and organizations are encouraged to integrate Healthy People 2010 into current programs, special events, publications, and meetings and use the objectives to monitor changes over time.

As 2010 is quickly approaching, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other government organizations are beginning to assess whether the Healthy People 2010 objectives have been met. And in some cases the results aren't looking good!

The State Indicator Report on Fruits and Vegetables, 2009 was recently released by CDC. The chart below shows the Healthy People 2010 objectives for fruit and vegetable intake as well as the current statistics on consumption.

Healthy People 2010 Objective 2009 Consumption(adults)* 2009 Consumption (adolescents)**
Fruits At least 75% of Americans eating the recommended two or more daily servings of fruit 33% of adults meet the recommendation for fruit consumption 32% of students in grades 9-12 meet the recommendation for fruit consumption
Vegetables At least 50% of Americans eating the recommended three or more daily servings of vegetables 25% of adults meet the recommendation for vegetable consumption 13% of students in grades 9-12 meet the recommendation for vegetable consumption

*Assessed from fruit and vegetable survey items included in the 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS; adults aged ≥18 years).
** Assessed from fruit and vegetable survey items included in the 2007 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS; adolescents in grades 9-12).  

To see how your specific state is doing, click on the:

Adult Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Maps
Youth Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Maps

The report also highlights three key policy and environmental areas that need to be addressed to boost consumption.

1. Healthier food retail – supermarkets and grocery stores need to stock a variety of high-quality fruits and vegetables; only 8 states have a policy for healthier food retail improvements in increase the number of full-service grocery stores, increase the availability of healthier foods in small food stores, and promote healthier foods through point of purchase messages.

2. Availability of healthier foods in schools – only 1 in 5 middle and high schools offer fruits and non-fried vegetables in vending machines, school stores, or snack bars; and 21 states have a policy to support farm-to-school programs that increase access to produce and teach children about agriculture and nutrition. 

3. Food system support – 20 states have state-level food policy councils, or agencies and community organizations that look at access to fresh produce and make recommendations about policies and programs including farm-to-school programs, community gardens, farmers markets, and availability of fresh produce in supermarkets.

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