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From The Cooper Institute and Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas

The harder you work, the harder it is to surrender. - Vincent Lombardi


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    Monthly Archives: September 2009

Be Active to Catch Zzzzs Faster
Written by September 28, 2009

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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  Listen up Moms and Dads.  Do you dread bedtime because your youngster just can’t seem to wind down?  Maybe they get in bed but don’t easily fall asleep, thereby reducing their – and maybe your – total sleep time.  Then get them moving more.  No, not right before bedtime but throughout the day.  Researchers in New Zealand measured the physical activity of seven-year-olds by having them where an accelerometer for 24 hours1.  They also collected sleep data on the children. The average (median) time it took for the children to fall asleep was 26 minutes.  But those who were

New Study Shows Diet Trumps Genes in Obesity
Written by September 24, 2009

Rachel Huber, MPH, RD

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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Two months ago we posted a blog (http://blog.standupandeat.org/post/2009/08/Can-You-Outwit-Your-Genes.aspx) that described recent research suggesting that physical activity may reduce the high body mass index (obesity) level that might otherwise be expected in people with a specific gene variant, the FTO gene. New research shows that diet, too, may play a bigger role than genes in obesity. Published in the September 2009 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition1, researchers analyzed eating habits of almost 5,000 people with and without the FTO gene variant. The risk of becoming obese was found to be 2.5 times higher for those who have double copies of the

Move More to Live Better Longer
Written by September 21, 2009

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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We have had numerous blogs already about the health benefits of physical activity in older adults.  It reduces chronic disease risk factors, improves mental outlook, and improves ability to live independently.  A new study confirms many of these benefits and shows that being physically active can even extend the length of life. Scientists in Israel followed a cohort of men and women from age 70 to age 881.   They assessed the study participants’ health habits, medical status, and physical function at baseline and at ages 78 and 85.  They also tracked down who in the cohort died at these time

Cancer Risk Goes Down When Exercise Intensity Goes Up
Written by September 14, 2009

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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In the Stand Up & Eat blog, we often focus on the benefits of not being sedentary (that’s the “Stand Up” part).  We also have reminded blog readers time and time again that moderate-intensity physical activity provides significant health benefits.  Here is a sampling of several moderate-intensity focused blogs: Moderate Means What? Walking = Calories Burned = Less Weight Loss Be Active Your Way So if there is any area that we have skimped a bit is on the value of vigorous-intensity physical activity.  The reason we bring up the importance of vigorous-intensity is that there is yet another cancer-related

New Online Tool for Selecting Superior Snacks
Written by September 10, 2009

Rachel Huber, MPH, RD

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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Researchers at the Center for Healthy Weight and Nutrition at Columbus, Ohio- based Nationwide Children’s Hospital have recently released an online tool that rates snacks based on 11 nutritional parameters*: calories, total fat, saturated and trans fat, sodium, fiber, sugar, protein, calcium, iron, and vitamins A and C. Their rating system was designed using the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005 and Daily Values found on the Nutrition Facts labels of packaged foods. The Snackwise® System assigns points for each nutritional parameter, and categorizes a snack as green (best choice), yellow (choose occasionally), and red (choose rarely), based on it’s nutrient density (of the nutrients

It's Not Just the Swine Flu (H1N1 Virus) that Can Make You Sick this Fall
Written by September 7, 2009

Ruth Ann Carpenter, MS, RD

Lead Integrator
Health Integration, LLC

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In the United States, foodborne diseases have been estimated to cause 6 million to 81 million illnesses and up to 9,000 deaths each year. Thus, it's just as important to protect yourself and your family from unsafe foods as it is from the Swine Flu. To make food safety much easier the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Health and Human Services (HHS) recently launched a consumer website at www.foodsafety.gov. Here, you'll find everything from the latest food recall to how long eggs can be stored in the refrigerator to how to pack a safe school lunch. Think you know how to keep your foods safe?

Labor Day Reflection
Written by

Gina Cortese-Shipley, MS

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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Today is Labor Day.  According to U.S. Department of Labor, Labor Day “is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.” While the vast majority of adults “labor” at some type of job, I thought it would be interesting find out which jobs are the most laborious. That is, burn a lot of calories.  Here they are:   Job Task Calories burned per hour* Firefighting 1,002 Scuba diving (e.g., Navy

The American Heart Association Gets Specific About Added Sugar
Written by September 3, 2009

Rachel Huber, MPH, RD

Associate Director of Education
The Cooper Institute

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The American Heart Association (AHA) has revised it's recommendation from "minimize the intake of beverages and foods with added sugar" to "limit intake of added sugar to half of your discretionary calorie allowance, which for most American women is no more than 100 calories per day and for most American men is no more than 150 calories per day from added sugars."1 AHA has come to recognize that the average American's intake of added sugar is way too high (about 355 calories per day!) and that excess sugar consumption is linked to adverse health conditions (obesity, high blood pressure) and deficiencies

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